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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
an unmistakable change at the top at the pentagon. our pentagon correspondent jim miklaszewski is traveling with him and tonight has an exclusive interview with the secretary. >> reporter: the new secretary of defense leon panetta surveyed iraq from a u.s. military helicopter today and was troubled by the landscape below. u.s. forces here, set to withdraw by the end of the year, are once again caught up in a war. 15 troops were killed last month by roadside bombs. panetta told a gathering of soldiers today the killing must end. >> my first responsibility as secretary of defense is to make damned sure that we do everything necessary to protect you. >> reporter: panetta pressured iraq's top officials to send iraqi military forces out to hunt down the attackers. in an interview with nbc news, panetta suggested if not, american combat forces would do the job. >> all i can tell you is i do have the authority and the responsibility to defend u.s. soldiers. >> reporter: this is panetta's first overseas trip as secretary of defense. on the flight over, he surprised many when he declared that al qae
closes its doors. nbc's jim miklaszewski looks at a place that treated everyone from privates to presidents. >> reporter: for more than 100 years, walter reed has been on the front lines of military medicine, from world war i until today, caring for americans wounded in war. colonel norvell coots is the commander at walter reed. >> this has been such an important place for healing. >> reporter: it is also an invaluable piece of american history. >> we're entering the sitting room of the pershing suite. >> reporter: world war i general dr. jack pershing lived and died at walter reed. dr. john pierce says others flocked here for his military advice. >> and so two star general george s. patton came to this room, got down on his knees on this rug. >> reporter: right here? >> right here. and general pershing blessed him before he went off to war. >> reporter: president dwight eisenhower died here in 1969. and for decades, every commander in chief has been drawn to walter reed in times of war. over the past ten years, 18,000 americans wounded in iraq and afghanistan have been treate
of al qaeda. nbc's pentagon correspondent jim miklaszewski is traveling with the sec. fare. the secretary. >> reporter: leon panetta arrived in afghanistan, his first trip as secretary of defense, but it was on the flight over when he dropped the bombshell on al qaeda. >> we're within reach of strategically defeating al qaeda. >> reporter: panetta said the killing of osama bin laden by u.s. commandos two months ago and in an increasingly intense campaign of predator air strikes aimed at top terrorist leaders ó has staggered al qaeda. >> i think we had undermined their ability to conduct 9/11-type attacks. i think we had them on the run. >> reporter: in kabul the military's leader of the u.s. war in afghanistan, general david petraeus agreed. >> al qaeda's senior leadership is lessÑi capable of threatenin targets anywhere. >> reporter: panetta said recent intelligence h ayman al zawahiri is believed holed up in the western tribal regions of pakistan. he also revealed that up to 20 top al qaeda leaders from pakistan, yemen, and somalia were identified from laden's compound
was blunt. he said it would be devastating. well, today our pentagon correspondent jim miklaszewski followed up in an exclusive conversation with admiral mullen. >> reporter: brian, admiral mullen fully expected to talk to the soldiers and marines about the war here in afghanistan. not the one in washington. >> they weren't talking about afghanistan. they weren't talking about the fight they were in. this isn't surprising, but when you're deployed you want to make sure everything's okay at home. >> soldiers and marines in the middle of a war zone worrying about getting paid. >> they always worry about getting paid. they just sort of expect it to happen. >> reporter: you said that if, in fact, paychecks were held up, that many in the services would be devastated by missing a single paycheck. what do you mean by that? >> over half of us are married now. we're living paycheck to paycheck. so each paycheck means a lot. they count on it. so somehow i would certainly hope we could work our way through this so that these young men and women who are sacrificing so much, that you've seen this week in
at the top at the pentagon. jim miklaszewski is traveling with him and tonight has an exclusive interview with the secretary. >> reporter: the new secretary of defense leon panetta surveyed iraq from a u.s. military helicopter today and was trou e troubled by the landscape below. troops scheduled to withdraw by the end of the are caught up again in the war. panetta told a gathering of soldiers today the killing must end. >> my first responsibility as secretary of defense is to make damned sure that we do everything necessary to protect you. >> reporter: panetta pressured iraq's top officials to send iraqi military officials out to hunter down attackers. in an interview with nbc news, he said if not, american combat forces would do the job. >> all i can tell you is i do have the authority and the responsibility to defend u.s. soldiers. >> reporter: this is panetta's second trip to visit the u.s. defense. >> we're within reach of strategically defeating al qaeda. >> reporter: in baghdad today, panetta misspoke when he appeared to suggest to these soldiers that the u.s. invaded iraq because
, brian, there's no holding him back. >> all right, jim miklaszewski traveling with the secretary tonight. jim, thanks. >>> now we turn to libya where the uprising against moammar gadhafi is now entering it's fifth month and is at a stalemate and while we have been hearing a lot of the rebel forces in benghazi, east of the capital, now its west of the front, a lot closer to tripoli. mike tiabbi is there where the rebels say they're preparing for an all-out assault on gadhafi's center of power. mike, good evening. >> reporter: brian the rebels here say they have a better shot at getting to tripoli and getting to moammar gadhafi than those in the east who have been stalled hundreds of miles away for months. but gadhafi is fighting back too, turning his town into a ghost town. three more platoons of rebel soldiers ready to join the war. the training here in maloot, just 40 miles from the border crossing in tunisia the rebels control. they also control almost all the mountain towns along the main highway surrounding the gadhafi town of tripoli. now the rebels are aiming for the town of garyan
of making the country much more secure. nbc's jim miklaszewski is in baghdad tonight. jim? >> reporter: lester, for most americans iraq has become the forgotten war. but all that was shattered last month when 15 american soldiers were killed here. the highest monthly death toll in more than two years. secretary panetta who arrived here today claims the americans were targeted and killed by roukrouk iraqi extremists with especially lethal weapons provided by iran. rockets that actually have trash cans welded to them loaded with 200 pounds of explosives. while here secretary panetta intends to pressure the iraqi government to put a stop to these deadly attacks. >> i would like for iraq to exert more of an effort to go after those that -- those extremists that are making use of these weapons. that if we are going to be partners, they have a responsibility to be able to protect against that kind of attack. >> reporter: this comes as iraqries are expected to ask the u.s. to keep some forces here beyond the deadline for withdrawal of all americans from iraq by the end of this year. u.s. offi
.s. troops scheduled to leave that country by the end of the year. jim miklaszewski is traveling with the new secretary. mik, the sofa agreement, the idea all of u.s. forces out by the end of this year, that's going to get extended? >> reporter: nobody knows quite yet, because the rairaqis themselves haven't made the decision and haven't made the request to the u.s. to extend that deadline. you know, i can tell you, secretary of defense, leon panetta, this has been quite a maiden voyage to him, expressed his frustration to the troops here today we by saying, dammit, make a decision, to the iraqis. and the problem, of course, here is that the u.s. starting to withdraw many of their forces, and they don't want to wait too long, because once they start tearing things down, they don't want to have to put it together again if the iraqis finally make that choice. and we're told, of course, that the white house, president obama and certainly secretary panetta are leaning toward providing additional forces for additional security and training here in iraq past the deadline. again, there are some poli
mullen, discovered for himself today, nbc's jim miklaszewski is traveling with him. >> reporter: here at the hot spots of kandahar, american soldiers and marines are still dodging bullets, rockets and road side bombs every day. amazingly, when they had a cc1: chance to throw questions at the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, admiral mike mullen, their number one concern was the ongoing debate back home over the debt ceiling. >> the checkbook is not unlimited. >> reporter: admiral mullen told soldiers at kandahar that if the talks failed they'd still have to fight but they might not get paid. >> there are plenty of you that are living paycheck to paycheck: so if paychecks were to stop, it can have a devastating impact, and it can have a devastating impact pretty quickly. >> reporter: at camp leatherneck, mullen told marines given the state of the u.s. economy, all the services face a cutback in the size of the force, and maybe even military benefits. >> we're going to have to tighten our belts. we're going to have to prioritize, have to make some hard decisions. >> reporter: so he
retired its flags yesterday after more than a century of treating u.s. soldiers. jim miklaszewski looks at the place that helped heal so many and suffered its share of scandal. >> reporter: walter reed has been on the front lines of military medicine, caring for americans wounded in war. the commander at walter reed. >> this has been such an important place of healing. >> reporter: it's also an invaluable piece of american history. >> we're entering the sitting room of the president suite. >> reporter: dr. john deere says others flocked here for his military advice. >> george s. patton got down on his knees on this rug and he was blessed before he went off to war. >> reporter: president dwight eisenhower died here in 1969. and for decades, every commander in chief has been drawn to walter reed in times of war. over the past ten years, 18,000 americans wounded in iraq and afghanistan have been treated here. critical care nurse rosemary ettinger is inspired by their spirit and determination. >> young soldiers, all they want to do is get better to get back to their troops. >> reporter: a s
at the pentagon. lester. >> jim miklaszewski in kabul tonight. >>> south sudan became the world's newest country today, gaining independence from sudan after five decades of struggle. tens of thousands celebrated the occasion, while south sudan is rich in oil, it is under developed and still will rely on pipelines controlled by sudan. president obama said both countries will be more secure and prosperous if they move peacefully beyond their differences. >>> tomorrow at the white house it's this country's budget woes that will be front and center as the president has a rare sunday sit-down with both democrats and republicans. nbc's mike is at the white house tonight. >> reporter: good evening. a source close to those negotiations says the chance for a so-called grand bargain on reducing this nation's national debt are now waning. on the table, a package worth some $4.5 trillion in savings over ten years. it would dramatically overhaul the tax code, make it simpler and flatter. it would reduce taxes all the way around, all up and down the income ladder. many tax loopholes, breaks, and subsidies fo
expected to rise. natalie? >> jim miklaszewski in baghdad for us this morning. thanks so much, jim. >>> in russia, hope of finding survivors is fading this morning after an old soviet era tourist cruise ship sank sunday. more than a dozen people have been confirmed dead so far and more than 100 other passengers are feared dead, as well. emergency officials say the boat was carrying more than its licensed capacity. >>> a firefighter who died at a texas rangers baseball game last week will be remembered today. shannon stone fell to his death while trying to catch ball for his 6-year-old son who was seated beside him in the stands. the funeral will be held today in the hometown of brownwood, texas. >>> it's monday. off to work for the shuttle "atlantis" astronauts who are delivering a year's worth of food, clothes and otherwise to the space station. they're monitoring a piece of space junk that could come too close to the joints on tuesday. >>> and as you saw here earlier, a major comeback for team usa in germany battling soccer great brazil. abbey wamba tied up the game with a header
about as we've been interviewing jim miklaszewski out in the field, boots on the ground, saying are we going to get paid for fighting the fight? >> agree with you. that is a contentious issue. we have men and women in harm's way. this administration, congress, we've made the decision to send men and women into harm's way and to engage in these battles. the right thing to do is give them what they need. so i think you will find a lot of resistance to those kinds of cuts to the defense this is not the time and we -- it's a moral obligation. if we send these young men and women out, we need to give them what they need to be successful in their endeavors and that's where you will see resistance from the republican side. >> congressman ann marie beu referen beurkle, thank you very much. >> thank you. it was great to be here. >>> in a few minutes, we'll speak with benjamin kracardin. right back with that. >>> taking a look at capitol hill, the senate will be in session in less than 20 minutes from now. today, the entire u.s. economy hangs in the balance with the debt ceiling deadline two day
this morning. our correspondent jim miklaszewski is there. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, natalie. u.s. military officials are telling us three or four rockets hit the green zone this morning. they're saying this is clearly a welcome shot for secretary panetta, who told us in an interview just a few minutes ago that iraqi extremists that are being armed by iran with sophisticated weapons are targeting and killing americans. 15 american soldiers were killed just last month. and one soldier told us this morning they're coming after us. now, in our interview with secretary panetta he said that he's demanding that iran back off and that the iraqi security forces step up to protect the americans. but if that doesn't happen he says that he has the authority to order the u.s. military into action. and that could mean preemptive combat strikes against those extremists. the problem, however, is that as the american military starts to withdraw from iraq, they're all supposed to be out by the end of this year, those attacks against u.s. forces are only expected to rise. natalie? >> jim miklasze
of treating wounded american fighters and presidents. nbc news chief pentagon correspondent jim miklaszewski looked at the place that helped heal so many and suffered its share of scandal. >> for more than 100 years, walter reed has been on the front lines of military medicine, caring for americans wounded in war. colonel kutz is the commander at walter reed. >> this has been such an important place of healing for all of them. >> reporter: it's also an invaluable piece of american history. >> we're entering the sitting room of the suite. >> reporter: world war general blackjack pershing lived and died at walter reed. dr. pierce says other flocked here for his military advice. >> and two-star general patton came here to this room, got down on his knees on this rug. >> right here. >> right here. and general pershing blessed him before he went off to war. >> reporter: president dwight eisenhower died here in 1969. and for decades, every commander in chief has been drawn to walter reed at times of war. over the past ten years, 18,000 americans wounded in iraq and afghanistan have been treated he
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)